Category Archives: spiritual growth

Ask God—Don’t Command Him–Another “New Commandment”

“Ask” is one of the new commandments that Christ has given us. No. Really. Ask. Simple, right?

He has commanded us to ask. We are very acquainted with His words. “Ask, and it shall be given.” And so we try to ask God for things in our prayers. But most of us are not really asking; we are commanding Him, not asking Him!

I examined my prayer life, and I found that I was using commands in my prayers: “God, help brother William. Give him strength to fight the disease. Heal him, God.” Sounds okay. I’m trying to get some help for William. But I was giving God commands! “Help…Give…Heal…” I was telling God what to do and when to do it. I was not asking Him reverently. I was giving Him commandments instead of obeying His new commandment.

Someone will say, “But my heart was in the right place. God looks on the intent of the heart.” But should the “right place” be a source of commands for God to keep, dished out by us?

This new commandment is clear: “Ask.” Ironically, it is a command, telling us to use the interrogative mood in our prayers, by asking Him to supply our petitions. But we do not do this; we use the imperative mood, commanding Him to do things for us.

We need to stop telling God what to do. What audacity and hubris we exhibit toward Him! What a complete lack of humility we demonstrate. And we are not even aware of it!

Demanding of God and commanding Him to do things is being childish. We see it in our earthly offspring. Little children rarely ask for anything. For example, they don’t say, “May I have more toast?” They will innately use a command: “Give me some more toast.” Children command and demand; that is what they do.

The spiritual children of God are still giving commands. We must grow up and mature and obey Christ’s new commandment, “Ask.” By asking Him instead of commanding Him, we will immediately see and feel a softening of our hearts toward Him and others. We will begin to sense just how weak and vulnerable we are, and how strong He is.

“Ask and it shall be given” (Matt. 7:7). It is one of the first biblical precepts that we were exposed to. And yet, it is so profound. For when we ask God and not command Him, it leads us through the gates of humility and ushers us into the arena of true communion and communication. Getting this revelation opens up a most astounding promise. “If you ask anything in my name, I will do it” (John 14:14). It does not get any more exciting than that!    Kenneth Wayne Hancock

 

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Virtue Is Moral Strength and Power—Where Does It Come From?

God has given you and me power and authority over Satan. I know. I know. You’ve heard this all before, heard it through powerless, well-meaning lips. Nevertheless, you and I are the recipients of power from God to change this world.

Because we have taken our old sinful self to the cross and have received a new heart from our Father, He has given us “the faith of the Son of God.” And now He commands us to add virtue to that faith. We have received His faith, which is Him believing in His own word. And virtue is that moral strength, vigor and power of God’s divine nature, now given to us to add to faith (II Peter 1: 1-10).

And through His virtue in us He has given us the power to share with others the goodness of our King. We now have power to liberate those who remain captives of carnality, to those still struggling with sin in their lives. Through His Spirit within, we have power to help the brokenhearted through their trials. He has given us now the strength and power to free those who are bound like prisoners in dungeons of despair;. He has sent us “to give unto them beauty for ashes, the oil of joy for mourning, the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness; that they might be called the trees of righteousness, the planting of the LORD, that He might be glorified” (Isa. 61: 1-3).

But before divine power will flow through us to achieve all these things, evil must first strike. Why? You cannot be a savior if there is no one that needs saving. You cannot be a healer if there is no one who needs to be healed. Before a resurrection miracle, there must be a death. The ultimate show of moral strength and power is resurrecting someone. That can only happen through the death of the one to be raised up.

Christ said it best. “Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof.” I scratched my head for 45 years on those enigmatic words. Translated: Every day has its own ration of “evil” for us to overcome or deal with. Let’s not add to it.

Adding Virtue

That is why those chosen for this auspicious calling will add the seven additions to the “faith once delivered to the saints.” They have no choice really. “For the gifts and calling of God are without repentance.”

But this power is not given to Tommy Thomson or Larry Lansing or any other human being. This power is given to Christ in Tommy, Larry, you, and me. For it is “Christ in you, the hope of glory.” And it is glorious when the anointed Spirit in us flows through our bodies, surging through and into the soul in need, thus proving Yahweh’s love and mercy.

But how is this power exercised in us? How does God work miracles through us? First things first. It starts out by understanding and then walking in the early apostles’ teachings. They had the power and authority from God, and they left us a roadmap to intense spiritual growth.

That roadmap is the teachings of Christ passed on to the early apostles. Luke called them “the apostles’ doctrine,” the teachings of the apostles. Christ’s doctrine became the “apostles’ doctrine.” Some people today are averse to the word “doctrine,” but it only means “teachings.” The early apostles “continued steadfastly in the apostles’ doctrine.” The fruit of that brought “many wonders and signs…done by the apostles” (Acts 2: 42-43). Power was given to the apostles because they were faithful to the teachings of Christ. And His teachings became theirs. And His power became theirs, also.

If you are seeing what I am saying, then “blessed are your eyes, for they see: and your ears, for they hear.” If you have seen through the shallowness of churchianity and long and hunger for the true living waters, then perhaps He has chosen you to “bear much fruit” and to walk with the patriarchs, prophets and the apostles, along with the King Himself.

Realizing all this brings a moment of gravity and humility. “For to whom much is given, much is required.” Think about it.  Of all the billions living on this planet, the Creator has chosen us to reveal His secrets and mysteries to. And the secret and mystery is this: “Christ in you, the hope of glory.” The Spirit of Christ in you and me! This is where the virtue power comes from.

The following is very important. The amount of the Spirit in us depends on how much understanding and knowledge we have about the Father’s ways and means. We must  know Him as the instigator of all things in this life—both good and bad—for our perfection. When we know Him as our “Prince of peace” and our “Prince of pain,” our Savior and the Supplier of our sufferings, then we will be closer in “knowing Him and the power of His resurrection.

Kenneth Wayne Hancock

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Adding the “Additions to the Faith”—By Faith

To bear “much fruit” and thereby attain to full spiritual maturity, we must add certain qualities of His “divine nature” to our faith (II Pet. 1: 3-10). God has called and chosen us to grow and bear 100 fold fruit (Matthew 13, “The Parable of the Sower”). To walk in His divine nature, knowledge must be added to virtue. And we see that virtue is the initial moral goodness and righteousness that comes with a new heart.

To grow we must understand God’s use of not just what we perceive to be “good” toward us, but also what we perceive to be evil. We will never grow to be like Christ and His apostles if we do not understand how God uses evil to develop the attributes of agape love in our hearts. That is His whole purpose, a mystery hidden from the eyes of man. And that purpose is to reproduce agape love, which is Himself.

The apostle Peter says, “I will not be negligent to put you always in remembrance of these things…” So, it goes like this. By faith we have received a new heart and a new spirit from our Father by believing that Christ is raised from the dead—in our hearts. “Old things are passed away, and all things have become new.” We are “new creatures in Christ.” This is the way that God sees His work in us (Rom. 6: 1-11).

To His way of thinking, it is a done deal. God “quickens the dead and calls those things that be not as though they were.” You and I are the “dead” here. He has raised us from the dead through Christ’s Spirit now in us. We, walking in 100 fold spiritual growth, are the “things that be not.” We are not there yet, but Christ has great faith, and He sees us there! We are to walk in His belief system (Rom. 4: 17; I Cor. 1: 27-28).

Our struggle is to believe the same thing that He believes about us. He has chosen us, the weak, to confound the mighty. That is His faith that we have received in our hearts. And to that faith we add virtue. We add it—by faith. And to virtue we add the knowledge of good and evil. And to knowledge we add temperance, and to temperance patience/endurance. And to endurance, we add godliness, which is loving God [forgiving Him for using both “good” and “bad” in our life]. And then adding “brotherly kindness”/loving other people [Forgiving them for being human, and understanding that they have been dealing with some harsh “bad things” in their lives].

And we are to add agape love to all of the above. For His love is the bond of perfectness, of maturity. With this spiritual maturity in us, God will be loving mankind—through us! And that will fulfill His eternal purpose to reproduce Himself.   Kenneth Wayne Hancock

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Adding the Knowledge of Good and Evil

Once we understand that the angels are spirits and that 1/3 of them have been sent here to earth to do a job under an arch-angel named Lucifer, later named Satan—once we comprehend that this evil cabal of hurtful spirits are sent to wreak havoc upon mankind for (and this is a hard one) our perfection—and once we realize that the evil angels are really only spirits sent to actually help us become manifested sons and daughters of God [Concerning the angels, “Are they not all ministering spirits, sent forth to minister for them who shall be heirs of salvation?” Heb. 1: 14.]—once we see that all this is an integral part of His plan, then the vista begins to clear as we see that our Father does all things well.

Our Father/Creator/Savior is sovereign. He has a purpose and a plan to carry out His purpose, which is this: He is reproducing Himself, and He is Love. And that plan includes both good and evil. Good and evil do not just exist; rather they are tools to use on us “lively stones.” They are used to chip away at our imperfections, preparing us to be laid near Christ the “Cornerstone” of the temple of God. He uses both good and evil to accomplish His plan to fulfill His purpose.

Some of you right now are having to endure unspeakable heartbreak as you see loved ones around you spiritually disintegrate before your eyes. To your understanding, this is a tragedy. Think of that thing that happened unjustly to you, that incident that is really too painful still to think about. It was a trial that, like a tidal wave, sweeps your little ship of peace to the sandy bottom, leaving you thrashing and gasping for air.

And all you were doing was enjoying the sun and surf, enjoying the peace and joy of God, enjoying a new found desire to serve Him. And then the betrayal came. It came through the only ones who could hurt you. It came and locked you into a lonely room of despair with no way to escape, leaving you in shock, wondering why you been forsaken and slandered, perhaps your reputation destroyed, your life uprooted.

Think of that painful situation, and then know that the same God who had blessed you with love and joy is the same One who dispenses evil into our lives, delivering hurtful sufferings that usher us into a deeper walk with Him, a walk we cannot comprehend the why. As Job told his wife, “What? Shall we receive good at the hand of God, and shall we not receive evil?”

Understanding Why Evil Comes into Our New Lives

God arranges for evil to come into our new lives to give us opportunities to forgive others, and to even forgive Him. For it is forgiving others that generates agape love in our hearts. The suffering that we endure is an opportunity for us to forgive those who trespass against us. This shows His power and love through us.

So, we should not think that it is a strange thing that God is the instigator of unbearable trials in our lives, “as though some strange thing has happened” unto us, but realize that it is needed for our growth (I Pet. 4: 12-13). Agape love grows out of forgiveness, which reproduces God, thus fulfilling His purpose.  Kenneth Wayne Hancock

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The Symbiotic Relationship of God and Mankind

Life is a growing and a maturing. Just look out your window at the living things. They are growing into maturity that they might reproduce themselves. We not only are growing physically, but also mentally and spiritually. And we are created in His image and likeness. So why is the thought that God grows so unbelievable?

Yahweh, translated “the LORD,” grew into His perfect maturity when He manifested Himself in the Son. Some will take offense, so let me explain. “God is Love,” agape love. The universal law of love states: “Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends” (John 15: 13). In order to fulfill this law, the Father would have to lay down His life for others. But the Father is an immortal Spirit and cannot die.  He could not fulfill this law and thereby express the greatest love while in His first spiritual estate.

So in His brilliant plan, He would pour out His Spirit into a specially prepared mortal man who would then submit to the death of the cross to save down fallen mankind, who were before prepared for this purpose. In a word, the sacrifice of Christ, the Son of God, would fulfill the greatest love explained in the above quote.

“God was manifest in the flesh” (I Tim. 3: 16). “God was in Christ…” (II Cor. 5: 19). Christ said that it was the Father in him that was doing all the miracles. And Christ has given us this new commandment: “Believe me that I am in the Father, and the Father in me…” (Jn 14: 11).

Symbiosis

The Father Yahweh is Love. He completed the first leg of His own everlasting life cycle, by demonstrating the greatest and most perfect/mature love in the history of the Creator and the Created. The Immortal One had to create a mortal being—the human being—in order to be able to show that He is the greatest Love through the death, burial, and resurrection of Christ. It was through Christ “laying down His life” for others that proved God is the greatest Love.

So death is an instrumental part of the Creator’s plan. For the Creator Yahweh cannot be the Creator without the Created. And in like manner, neither can Yahweh fully become the Savior without someone who needs saving. And that someone that needs to be saved cannot exist without sin entering into his heart. The evilness of sin must be a reality in fallen man in order for God to have someone to save and thereby show His great love and mercy to us. And make no mistake; Yahweh, and only Yahweh is the savior.

That is what His Spirit spoke through the prophets Isaiah and Hosea. “I, even I, am Yahweh; and beside me there is no savior…” (Isa. 43: 11; 45: 21; Hos. 13: 4). Christ’s words confirm this. “The word which you hear is not mine, but the Father’s which sent me…The words that I speak unto you I speak not of myself: but the Father that dwells in me, he does the works…” The Father does the miracle of salvation (John 14: 10, 24).

How important is believing this true knowledge about the Father and the Son? Christ answers: “He that believes on me, the works that I do shall he do also; and greater works than these shall he do…” He has just promised us that if we believe on Him according to the above, then the Father in us will perform the same miracles that He did through Christ and His apostles and prophets. Furthermore, He states that “whatsoever you shall ask in my name, that will I do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son” (John 14: 12-13). Asking in His name. His Hebrew name. {I am going to put this in capital letters because it is so important} CHRIST’S HEBREW NAME MEANS “YAHWEH IS THE SAVIOR!” Christ came in His Father’s name Yah. “Yahshua” is the same name as the patriarch Joshua. {I wrote a whole book about this entitled Yah Is Savior: The Road to Immortality. Free copies are still available with free shipping. Details here: https://immortalityroad.wordpress.com/donate/}.

The symbiotic relationship of God and mankind is thus: God needs man to fulfill His own destiny as the glorious wise and loving Creator and Savior. And man certainly needs God to escape a certain trip to dark oblivion. We need Him more than He needs us, but nevertheless, He does need us to fulfill His plan and purpose of reproducing Himself, agape Love.

The Plan in Making Adam Weak

Our omniscient Creator moved on this by creating Adam and Eve weak—on purpose. It was not an experiment in the Garden of Eden that accidently ran amuck. No. He who knows the number of hairs on our heads, and He who sewed together our sinews, and spun and wove the exquisite optic nerves into our brains—no, He did not make a mistake. It was all planned. And “it was very good” (Gen. 1: 31).

In Adam God did not build a robot-like tower of strength. He could have, but that kind of creation would not serve His purpose of revealing Himself as the Savior. In His infinite wisdom and fore thought, He chose us long before He ever created the worlds. And He chose us to be with Him, with His purpose in mind.

And through this grace, He secured our destiny, before ordaining our steps here on earth. For this reason: We are to be earmarked to be used by Him for His purposes. When we surrender completely to Him, then He will have our backs. Many try to manipulate the Creator, trying to get Him to do their bidding. But that never works out well. Just look at the unanswered prayers that we all have flung heavenward. Just look how the plans of well-intentioned men “have come to naught.”

But He has His hand on us, long before our entrance as infants into this world. He has “predestinated us” for this purpose: that we could be placed as His spiritual offspring through Christ, who is the saving Son and who is the Creator/Father. That is not a misprint. Everyone will quote the following passage as a distinct prophecy of the coming Son of God. But somehow this part of the quote just doesn’t click. I know that you have read it.  “For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given…and His name shall be called…The everlasting Father…” (Isa. 9: 6).

Once we understand and believe why we were created in the first place, then we will realize that this present life upon this planet is all about God—Agape Love—reproducing Himself. And it can only happen through God saving a human being who sits humbled in the chains of sin.

We were made for God. God created us humans as His future dwelling place. In His eyes it is already a done deal. God sees us already sitting next to Him on His throne. After all, He created us to be overcomers. He has faith in His plan, purpose, and His word that explains all this. And, oh, yes. He has faith in us, His creation. The faith that the Bible keeps referring to is God’s faith and belief in His own genius and power to make it all happen. When we believe what and how He believes, then we are walking in faith. It is not our feeble little belief system. It is the faith of the Son of God, the Creator.

The few overcomers, the elect, the remnant, will answer the call. Because He fashioned us to do this. For in the end, we will see that it is all Him. He is the One, so merciful, so kind, so loving, that He would choose us to sit with Him on His throne. This is how He said it, “To him who overcomes I will grant to sit with Me on My throne…” (Rev. 3:21).

Many are called to this honor, but only a few are chosen. It is like seed being sown in a field. Some will come up and some won’t. May we all who read these words come up and rise up to be what He wants us to be.    Kenneth Wayne Hancock

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Virtue—Why We Must Add It to Faith

Because “all things are of God,” the very faith that we have now as Christians is not innate. We were not born with a belief in Him and His plan and purpose. It did not come up into our consciousness one day after we heard of the gospel. We received it from Him. We have “obtained like precious faith.” For the Christian life is lived “by the faith of the Son of God” which He has given us. We are now believing what He believes. He calls many, but chooses [elects] a few to fully walk in His faith (2 Cor. 5: 18; 2 Pet. 1: 1; Gal. 2: 20; Mat. 22: 14).

He has promised us through His faith now in us that we can walk with His “divine nature” coursing through our spirit. But we are admonished that we must diligently add to our faith seven aspects of His divine. By adding them we will make our “calling and election sure” (2 Pet. 1: 10). The first one to be added is virtue, or moral goodness.

But why do we need to add this moral goodness? When we first come into God and His ministry on earth, we are like babes. We do not know how to come in (to God’s plan and purpose) or go out (to do His will). We are, nevertheless, elated. We feel great joy and immense gratitude for the way our Father has with open arms welcomed us back into His presence.

By faith we have taken the plunge and have renounced our old life by submitting our selfish lives to the death of the cross with Christ (Rom. 6: 1-12). It is a stepping out there into the unknown, trusting our Father to protect us and sustain us on our new pilgrimage.

As we begin to walk in our new spiritual life with Christ, we experience a lifting of the burden of sin-guiltiness. New freedom flows in and around us. We exult in the liberty as Christ breaks the chains from off of our hearts.

It is here in this spiritual child’s playground that young Christians want to stay. They reason, “Why leave a good thing? I have always just wanted peace and love and joy, and Christ has granted me that. I am happy in this new life.”

And they stay right there. But God wants us to grow. So the joy and the elation begin to wane. And so at Christian gatherings pastors and church leaders try to drum up the spiritual reverb to simulate the initial joy that the “babes in Christ” first felt.

And so what started as God’s deliverance into His new way of living with joy and peace, turns into habit and ritual. Worship services turn into attempts to recapture that first moment of euphoria when they came into Christ. And the new flush of freedom becomes a carte blanche to act on whatever thought comes to mind. But spiritual children cannot discern which thoughts are from God and which are not. They do not “have their senses exercised to discern both good and evil” (Heb. 5: 14).

Because they have taken the faith of Christ and in the end used it to secure more joy for themselves, they must be admonished to “use not your liberty as an occasion to the flesh.” And because the child of God seeks a church house where members are like minded, there is no one to guide them away from the pitfalls of that kind of fellowship. They do not know that this spiritual environment just enables young Christians to stagnate and not grow. Ironically, the flow of the Spirit is blocked.

Some may be wondering, “Well, what else is there? I have given my life to Christ and have walked in the joy and freedom that He provides. So, what more is there? What do we need to do?

Peter gives the answer. We are not to remain spiritual “babes in Christ” forever. We are to grow and become full grown men and women of God like the early apostles. To remain as little children of God always seeking more stimulation in order to receive more joy is not the plan of God for any of us. He wants us all to grow spiritually. He wants us to “make our calling and election sure.” And to do that, we must add to our faith these seven attributes of the Spirit’s divine nature (2 Pet. 1: 3-12).

This is so crucial for our growth unto full maturity. Let me put it another way. If we do not heed what the Spirit is teaching us through Peter, we will remain children, “tossed to and fro, and carried about with every wind of doctrine, by the sleight of men, and cunning craftiness, whereby they lie in wait to deceive” (Eph. 4: 14). Little children will be deceived by false teachers, thereby stunting their growth.

So the first step to spiritual maturity is to “add to your faith virtue [moral goodness].”

[Ordering My Free Books in Paperback

I am now able to send you a copy of my books absolutely free with free shipping.  Please specify which one.

Yah Is Savior: The Road to Immortality explores the deeper meaning of our Savior’s Hebrew name Yahshua, which means Yahweh is the Savior.

The Unveiling of the Sons of God explains how the whole creation is waiting and longing for the manifestation (the unveiling) of the sons of God for these latter days. Christ will be totally formed in His elect as they will have grown and matured spiritually into His likeness and power.

The Royal Destiny of God’s Elect. It explores God’s vision for us, to be kings with Christ and how He will use us to reproduce His nature of Love.

My latest book is The Apostles’ Doctrine. Their doctrine was Christ’s teachings. And the early church walked in those teachings. This book reveals just what they are and how to walk in them.

Send your request, specifying which one of my books you desire, to my email address:  wayneman5@hotmail.com  Include your name and mailing address. For those outside the United States, or who may prefer a pdf copy of the last two books mentioned, please specify.  Also, you may read the first two books online at my website Immortality Road found here:   https://immortalityroad.wordpress.com

God bless you and your family, and thank you for taking a stroll with me on Immortality Road.]   Kenneth Wayne Hancock

Kenneth Wayne Hancock

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“Abide in Me and I in You”–What Does It Mean? How Does It Happen?

One of Christ’s New Commandments is, “Abide in Me, and I in you” (John 15: 4). This is not a polite request. It is a command. It is simply put in plain English, but what does it mean exactly? How does He abide in us, and how do we abide in Him? In order to obey this command, what exactly do we need to do?

First it helps to go to the Greek. “Abide” in the KJV is translated from the Greek word meno 61 times. It is also translated “remain” sixteen times, “dwell” fifteen times, “continue” eleven times, and “tarry” nine times. “Abide, remain, dwell, and continue” gives us a picture of how the word is used.

The Vine and the Branches

The verse “Abide in Me, and I in you” comes in the middle of a metaphor Christ was using to give us a picture of how the abiding of His Spirit takes place. Back in John 15: 1, He likens Himself to a grape vine, “the true vine.” He says that the Father is the husbandman or the vinedresser. Every vine has branches. But He says that if a branch does not bear fruit, the Father purges it or cuts it off and takes it away. He then prunes those branches that are bearing fruit so that they may bear more fruit (v. 2).

We need to pause here a moment. “Purges” the fruitless branch. “Cuts it off? Takes it away? Whoa. This is some serious sentiment here. The Father’s not fooling around. He’s all about bearing more and more fruit by pruning those of us who are supposed to bear fruit.

Then Christ the Great Teacher explains this new commandment. “Abide in Me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, except it abide in the vine; no more can you, except you abide in Me.” He is the Vine and we are the branches of that Vine. He is saying, Dwell in Me, and let Me dwell in you. Remain there free from false concepts. Continue in my plan and purpose. You can do this by believing Me that the Father, who is the Spirit, dwells first of all in Me. Since He is in Me, He can be in you.

Christ commands us to abide in the vine. How does a branch abide in the vine? It is an extension of the trunk of the vine. It is merely a conduit of the same sap (Spirit) that runs through the vine. Branches of the vine are where the fruit is borne. But they will only bear if they surrender to being a channel for the rising sap of the vine (v. 4).

Christ clears it up. “I am the vine, you are the branches. He who abides in Me, and I in him, bears much fruit; for without Me you can do nothing. If anyone does not abide in Me, he is cast out as a branch and is withered; and they gather them and throw them into the fire, and they are burned” (verses 5-6).

How Do We Abide/Dwell/Remain/Continue in Christ and He in Us?

We abide in Christ when we remain (abide, dwell) in His plan to accomplish His purpose. When it is “no longer I that lives, but Christ that lives in me.” This will take place after our trek to the cross where we surrender to His way and spiritually die with Christ and resurrect with Christ. It is never preached, but it is the only way to the Father. Do this and then He will abide in us. But that won’t happen if we believe that there are two distinct Gods up there, for the Father is the invisible Spirit abiding in the Son of man, which He earnestly desires to be us, too.

It is by believing that the Father dwells in the Son. That’s what the Son said. “Do you not believe that I am in the Father, and the Father in Me? The words that I speak to you I do not speak on My own authority; but the Father who dwells in Me does the works” (John 14: 10). Christ said that the Father Yahweh dwells in Him, and it is the Father/Spirit that is doing the miracles. You want to be a miracle worker like the early apostles? This is our ticket to enter that spiritual world that they walked in.

Then in the next verse comes another crucial New Commandment. “Believe me when I say that I am in the Father and the Father is in me; or at least believe on the evidence of the works themselves” (v. 11). This one is paramount to obey because if we cannot obey and believe that the Father/Spirit abides/dwells in the Son, then He won’t abide in us either. Not fully, so that we can bear “much fruit” like the early apostles and Christ.

But…If we do obey and believe Christ when He says that the Father abides in Himself, then look what happens. “He who believes in Me [believes His word that the Father dwells and abides in the Son], the works that I do he will do also; and greater works than these he will do…” (v. 12). The Father will dwell in us and do the same miracles that the Son of God did—if we believe Christ’s words about the Father/Son relationship.

The Abiding is when the Father, who is the Holy Spirit of Truth, comes into us and walks around in us and performs the works that He has always done.

To be continued…

Kenneth Wayne Hancock

 

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