By Promises We Partake of His Divinity

I write to my courageous brothers and sisters today. I share with the souls who have braved the turbulent oceans of man’s fickle and false claims of knowing Divinity. When quizzed about the “divine nature,” they will salute the greatness of God perhaps. But when asked how do we “partake of the divine nature,” very few will know the answer. Go ahead. Choose out a pastor/preacher. Ask them. Chances are that you will be disappointed, for they will not know the apostle Peter’s mind, which is the mind of Christ.

The Spirit dwelling in the apostle repeatedly taught the early church that they had “obtained like precious faith with us,” the early apostles (II Peter 1:1). First rattle out of the box, the Spirit says now to us, You all have received the very same faith that was delivered to the apostles. There is only one faith, the faith of the Son of God. The one faith is His faith, His belief system, what He believes.

The early church had access to the same power. They were not powerless. In fact, “His divine power has given unto us all things that pertain unto life and godliness.” And through all of this, God has given us “great and precious promises.”

Great and Precious Promises

What are these promises? Christ promised us that He would send the Spirit to us and that through His spiritual presence in you, “He will guide you into all truth” (John 16:13). Christ promised that if we asked anything in his name that he would do it (John 14:13-14; 15:16; 16:23). [“In His name” is the key phrase that opens the door to answered prayer. What is His name? And what does it mean? You need to order my book Yah Is Savior: The Road to Immortality.   It is free with free shipping. Details here:  Ordering My Free Books in Paperback | Immortality Road (wordpress.com) ]

Christ also made this astounding promise: “He that believes on me, the works that I do shall he do also; and greater works than these shall he do, because I go unto my Father” (14:12). What works did He do? He healed the sick and raised the dead for starters. He has promised us that we will do greater miracles than He did!

The preachers don’t believe that, for they will say that this Christlike power comes later for us, after we “go to heaven.” One thing is wrong with that theory. In heaven there are no sick people to heal, nor earthly dead to raise. So, His promises are for us who are alive on the earth. Just look at our examples Peter, John and Paul. The Spirit in them healed the sick and raised the dead.

He also promised that He is the same yesterday, today, and forever.  He promised to return to set up the Kingdom of God, with Christ our King on the throne. He also promised to give us eternal life and a place in His Government.

These are just some of the “exceeding great and precious promises.” We are still talking about a spiritual growth—growing into apostleship. These promises encourage us and spur us on to the finish line. And it is through these promises that we “might be partakers of the divine nature…” (II Peter 1:4).

To secure these precious promises, the apostle continues, we need to diligently “add to your faith” seven attributes of God’s nature. “If these things be in you, and abound, they make you that you shall neither be barren nor unfruitful in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ [Yahshua]” (verses  5-8).

These additions make our calling and election sure, where we will never fall (v. 10). Adding them opens the door into His Kingdom (v. 11). They are virtue, knowledge, temperance, patience, godliness, brotherly kindness, charity/agape love (I Peter 1:5-8).

Knowledge about what these additions are, their importance in helping us spiritually grow, and how we are to add them to our faith is the thesis of my new book, The Additions to the Faith, due out in the spring of 2023.

Kenneth Wayne Hancock

2 Comments

Filed under additions to our faith, belief, faith, kingdom of God, love, spiritual growth

Who Are the Future Manifested Sons and Daughters?

The Holy Scriptures speak of a group of Christians who will grow to become like the early apostles. Paul, John, and Peter wrote eloquently about them.

But who are these future immortal ones? The time in history is right for them to appear on the scene; it is the time of the end. Most Christians have read that “He is bringing many sons unto glory” (Hebrews 2:10). And they have read that He has given us power “to become the sons of God” (John 1:12). But most say that we cannot be like Paul, Peter and John. Who are the few who do believe, who are grown from the same seed as the apostles?

One major trait that they all have is an unsatiable appetite for the truth. They want the absolute, unadulterated truth as to why we are here on earth. Who is this Creator? What is His plan for us? What’s the timetable for coming events? What about the evil in the earth? Who inhabits Satan’s kingdom? Who is calling the shots, running the show, pulling the strings of the puppet politicians? How will the world end?

They want to know the truth about the things that touch all our lives. And when they hear it,    they are quick to lay the idols of their own prior understanding on the burn pile.

You can tell who they are by their ability to discern what is truth and what is a lie. God has given them this ability, and that is what sets them apart. That is what makes them different from other human beings. God has chosen them and ordain them for His mission. And he will not allow them to be deceived any longer.

It is this humility, this dependence on God’s Spirit, that allows them to seek and find the truth. Yes, God intervenes and creates a hunger in their hearts for truth. That is the beginning of God calling them to Himself. It’s the start of the Quest, when the hero awakens out of his selfish slumber. And he is made aware that there is something greater than his anemic little desires for vainglory. Something much greater than himself is afoot here. He begins to realize that something earth-shattering and then, earth-reshaping, lies in the prophetic pages soon to come to life for those who seek.

But it all starts when God instills the thirst for truth. It is all Him. He is behind everything. He is the “Author and Finisher of our faith.” He arranges our lives from desperation to the first steps on this pilgrimage to find the Source of love and peace. He injects our lives with desire to know Him who is the Truth. And then we learn that it is His ballpark—His bat, ball and gloves. He invites all to play. Those who show up for the meaningful and sometimes strenuous practices, will be learning to play by His rules. Those who learn them will be the starters at game time.

Kenneth Wayne Hancock  

8 Comments

Filed under additions to our faith, calling of God, end time prophecy, humility, manifestation of the sons of God

Patience, Godliness, and Wisdom—Their Relationship

Our spiritual growth in God does not happen accidentally. We have a part to play. A seedling plant must strive to break free from the clutches of the clods of hardened earth to get to the light.

So it is with God’s offspring, you and I. To grow and to fulfill God’s purpose for each of us, we must first gain knowledge of his plan, and then execute it. He is “bringing many sons [and daughters] unto glory.”

How is he doing this? He has several spiritual programs to accomplish His will. They are laid out in black and white in the Holy Bible. The programs for our growth are hiding in plain sight. But you won’t hear about them in the church houses, even though the early apostles wrote glowingly about their secrets. Their pastors, priests and preachers have closed their eyes and ears to anything new. Yet God’s programs are full of “new creatures, new testament, new hearts, new lives, where all things are become new.”

Some of the Programs

We should not think that once we profess Christ, it is all done. The Apostles’ Doctrine, the title of my 2019 book, expounds on one of God’s programs that shows us how to become like the early church. The apostles walked in the seven teachings that Christ taught them. Their doctrine was Christ’s doctrine/teachings. To be like the early apostles, we need to do what they did; they “continued steadfastly in the apostles’ doctrine,” and then power was given to do mighty works in the land.

Another of Christ’s programs to help us grow spiritually is what I am writing now–The Additions to the Faith. We must add, through much study and prayer, certain facets of God’s divine nature to His faith that now resides in us. But we cannot add them if we have no knowledge about these attributes of God.

We have seen that in order to fulfill God’s purpose of fully walking in his divine nature, we need to add to our faith certain attributes of that very divine nature. We see that we are to add patience to temperance. The problem has always been understanding these English words. We are dealing with three words: patience, godliness, and wisdom.

They are all scriptural, taken from the King James Version. All three are difficult to comprehend because of man’s traditional definitions and connotations placed on them. To get a clearer picture of their meaning, we go to the Greek texts.  “Patience” means endurance. “Godliness” means to love and revere God. Wisdom is to fear Him, or to be in reverential awe of Him.

We can all agree that we need more wisdom. “Wisdom is the principal thing; therefore, get wisdom…” (Proverbs 4:7). God has made it seemingly simple for us to get wisdom. Just ask Him for it, the apostle James tells us (1:5). But we cannot waver in unbelief (verse 6).

Why would we waver? Those that waver will not get wisdom (verse 7). I always thought that the wavering happened because of our weak faith in not believing at the outset that God would give us wisdom. But now I see that we waver when we don’t understand how overcoming trials produce wisdom. God tests our faith; going through these trials shows us just how awesome our great Creator is. We will see his great love for us in correcting us, getting us ready to sit with him on his throne. We have a lot of changing to do. Trials bring those changes about.

We still are talking about adding patience, and to patience godliness. Many early Christians had, no doubt, complained to James about the trials that they were going through. He gets straight to the point. “Consider it pure joy, my brothers, whenever you face trials of many kinds” (1: 2 NIV). Joy? The heathen are hunting us Christians down like dogs. How do we see this as bringing happiness? At first glance, it is difficult to see, but a profound revelation hides in the shadows of our disbelief.

How Trials Bring Joy

How do trials bring joy? These trials test our faith. This testing of our faith “develops perseverance” (verse 2, NIV). It “works patience.” Trials of the faith develops endurance/patience/perseverance (verse 3). Overcoming trials develops spiritual muscle needed for us to endure all things thrown our way.

When our Father tests, chastens, and corrects us, we tend to not understand just how blessed we are. That is why we are admonished to “let patience have her perfect work.” In other words, we must allow endurance and perseverance do the job of bringing us to spiritual maturity. This is what the additions to the faith is all about: The spiritual maturity of becoming like Christ and his apostles. “Perseverance must finish its work so that you may be mature and complete” (verse 4 NIV).

It is here at verse five that we receive an astounding revelation. The previous four verses show us  how  God gives us wisdom. “If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask God who gives liberally…”

But we must ask, “What does wisdom have to do with patience/endurance? What’s the tie-in?” First, we are admonished to ask for wisdom, not knowing how or from where it comes to us. God then gives us wisdom through orchestrating trials for us to overcome in our lives. These trials, as we have seen, produce endurance/patience. Then, on the other side of the testings and trials, we see that it produces in us a love and reverence for God in all His marvelous ways of creating us in His image. Love and reverence for Him is the very definition of wisdom. “The fear of the LORD, that is wisdom.” “Fear” in the Hebrew means “reverential awe.” Reverential awe of Yahweh, that is wisdom. Wisdom and patience/endurance combine to bring godliness to be added to patience. And the kicker is this: Godliness in the Greek means “a love and reverence for God.”

[See https://immortalityroad.wordpress.com/donate/ to order one of my books}

Kenneth Wayne Hancock

1 Comment

Filed under additions to our faith, apostles' doctrine, elect, glorification, knowledge

Adding Godliness to Patience

To bear the spiritual fruit that we are to bear in these last days, to be found worthy to sit with Christ on His throne, we must add to our faith certain spiritual attributes (II Pet. 1).

We are to add patience to temperance. And patience is endurance, as seen in the Greek text. We must “endure unto the end,” enduring persecution and tribulations, enduring “hardness as a good soldier” of Christ (Matthew 24:13; II Thes. 1:4; II Tim. 2:3). We must “endure all things for the elect’s sake,” especially “sound doctrine,” which are those Christ-borne teachings that attack man’s traditions that we have all been taught since childhood (II Tim. 2:10; 4:3).

And perhaps the most difficult thing to endure is the chastening of God. We must endure His correction when He begins to purge out the false teachings about Him and the immature ways we carry ourselves.

God will scourge us and prove us. He forewarns us: “My son, despise not the chastening of the Lord, nor faint when you are rebuked by Him.” For He chastens those He loves. “If we endure [this is the adding of patience/endurance] chastening [correction, disciplining], then God deals with us as sons and not bastards. When we have passed the tests, He receives us as his heirs, “that we might be partakers of His Holiness” (Heb. 12:5-10).

God endures our immaturity and our weakness and we, in turn, endure the maturing process. Understanding, accepting, and finally, welcoming these things that we must overcome—this brings spiritual maturity.

The Beginning of Godliness

Adding patience/endurance to our faith is the maturing process. Going through this maturing process brings about a reverence for God. We begin to revere Him for what He is doing and how He is including us in his plan of reproducing himself. Revering Him is adding godliness to patience/endurance.

Many say that “godliness” means “God-like-ness. It sounds good, but the word “godliness” is translated from the Greek word eusebeia (G2150), meaning reverence or respect. This Greek word is derived from eusebes (G2152), which comes from sebo (G4576), a verb meaning “to revere, to worship” (Strong’s).

We now are living by the faith of the Son of God (Gal. 2:20). There’s only one faith—Christ’s (Eph. 4:5). We are now building on His faith as we endeavor to add to it. Belief first, yes. But faith/belief alone is not enough. For “even the devils believe in one God and tremble.” Virtue and then knowledge must be added, then tempered, and then endurance is added as we overcome hardships.

As we begin to comprehend the magnitude of this heaven-directed spiritual life cycle that God has called us to, then love, devotion, awe, and reverence begin to grow in our hearts toward our Father. This is the beginning of us adding godliness/reverence to our faith. We do love Him because He first loved us. And the love of God is “shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Spirit.”

This reverence for God comes when we first know about his plan. And then, as we walk in it, we endure the tribulations and chastening on the road to sonship and daughtership. Then we begin to see that we [are] receiving a Kingdom which cannot be moved.” He is favoring us with this knowledge that “we may serve God acceptably with reverence and godly fear” [reverential awe] (Heb. 12:28).

Who Will Add Godliness/Reverence to the Faith?

So, all of this creates questions: Who is going to step up? Who are these people who will do the seven additions that the apostle Peter wrote to us about? They are out there. These articles are a tiny light flashing faintly in the ocean of mankind. I believe that “this little light of mine” is shining. Its rays will reach whomsoever He directs them to. Who are they? How will we know them? We will know them by their fruits. More next time.   Kenneth Wayne Hancock

1 Comment

Filed under additions to our faith, belief, elect, faith, glorification, sons and daughters of God, spiritual growth, Spiritual Life Cycle

Adding Patience–Enduring Spiritual Growing Pains

We are told to “make our calling and election sure” (2 Peter 1: 10). We do that by adding seven attributes of the divine nature of God to the faith of the Son of God now in us. Then the door will open into the “everlasting Kingdom of our Savior” (verse 11). God’s elect will take heed and make these seven additions.

The fourth one is patience. But what is it exactly? It is not the “patience” that we grew up with. Most of us thought that it was waiting, willing to stand by stoically until things improved. That is man’s concept of patience.

The biblical “patience” is God’s patience, translated from the Greek word hypomone meaning “endurance” or “perseverance” in some translations. Patience/endurance is a facet of God’s Spirit; it is a piece of His very Being that He transfers into us. God’s patience is His enduring all things.

Endurance only happens when we overcome a resisting force. We “partake of His divine nature” when we channel and show forth patience. For God has great patience as He endures until the harvest of the evil vine of the earth is complete. And He with great endurance waits for us to bring forth the spiritual fruit that we are destined to bear.

We need to add patience/endurance because we are called to add godlike qualities directly from His divine nature. His purpose is to multiply Himself—in us. Since endurance is a part of His nature, we need to add it to our faith, which is His faith (There is only one faith: Eph. 4:4-5).

Where do we get patience/endurance?

Since we are to be like our Father in full spiritual maturity, we are to endure like our Father endures. And He endures to bring His purpose and plan to pass. So we must endure to be like Christ who was all about doing the Father’s will. So, where do we get patience/endurance? How do we obtain it?

In order to endure, there must be something to endure. It is not any old “something.” It is not enduring a brain freeze caused by that bowl of vanilla ice cream. The endurance that God desires for us is the kind that Christ overcame—betrayals, temptations, sins against you, insecurities, fears, loneliness, deceit—real trials of the heart. Just think of the way everyone treated Christ; Peter denied Him three times. Paul killed His followers before his conversion. Trials can come before or after receiving Christ into our heart.

Trials can come through our own thoughts. I remember when I first became a Christian at 24. That first night a dark thought thrust through my mind. “You don’t really believe that He was raised from the dead, do you?” A frozen chill pierced my heart and shook me to the core. That was my first temptation. I brought the experience to my mentor, and he helped me get me back into His word.

Where does patience come from? “Tribulation works patience” (Rom. 5:3). Or “Suffering produces perseverance”/endurance (NIV). Or affliction and oppression bring forth endurance. It is tribulation that brings forth patience. In other words, one must go through the sufferings of Christ for tribulation to bring forth patience in our life. Patience is developed within us by enduring hardships in our Christian walk.

“The trying of your faith works patience” (James 1: 3). “The testing of your faith develops endurance” (NIV). These trials and tribulations bring about endurance, which we must have. For patience/endurance is a key spiritual component of the divine nature. We must endure like God endures in order to be like him. This patience/endurance is important, for only those who “endure to the end” will be saved (Matt. 10:22). Hard times are coming, brothers and sisters.

Adding patience/endurance is the catalyst that brings us to full maturity. Enduring the testings and trials is the rough road to agape love. “But let patience have her perfect work” [completed works of maturity]. We are to “go on to perfection.” And it is patience that brings about this spiritual growth to maturity in God’s life cycle in his people.

Agape love endures all things. Agape is the seventh addition. And it is patience/endurance that paves the way for God, who is Agape, to be fully formed in us.     Kenneth Wayne Hancock

1 Comment

Filed under additions to our faith, agape, faith

Banishing the Ghosts of Egos Past

In a moment of weakness, Christians will say that their “flesh” just took over, and, well, they sinned. This is not the whole spiritual story. It is old leaven teaching that is false and contradicts what the scriptures say. The Word says, “They that are Christ’s have crucified the flesh….” Crucified flesh is dead flesh. Let’s look a bit deeper into “flesh” because it is not our epidermis.

Sarx is the Greek word that is translated “flesh.” Thayer’s says that sarx is “the animal nature of old man Adam. It is the earthly nature of man apart from divine influence and, therefore, prone to sin…” It is the whole lost Adamic man, body and soul, that St. Paul refers to [See Gal. 5:16-19 and Rom. 6 & 8].

After we come to Christ and give our heart to Him, vestiges of the old nature, or rather ghostly memories of the old life come into our new life. It often is through a thought or an imagination or a reaction to certain stimuli that reminds us of what we used to be. These negative thoughts are whispered into our ears by a dark angel. Instead of standing on the word that says we have a new life where “all things have become new,” the spirits of egos past come back to haunt us to see if we really believe His word. They come by our adversary, the devil.

Temperance, then, is that aspect of the divine nature where we overcome these thoughts through cleaving to the truth of His word. The self-control that it brings is a result of the presence of the Spirit in our hearts. Temperance is the addition to the faith that dispels the vestiges of our old life. The truth as to what is taking place makes us free of the confusion.

If we “walk in the Spirit, we shall not fulfill the lust of the flesh.” The Spirit and the sarx, which is represented in vestiges of our old life, are opposites. The flesh is rooted in appeasing the old self. The Spirit is rooted in selflessness.

Many people teach that after receiving Christ, these two natures are at war in the Christian. This is not true. Again, many say that this old carnal nature still lives in a Christian. But the Bible says  just the opposite. “They that are Christ’s have crucified the flesh with its affections and lust.” (Gal. 5: 24). Furthermore, Christ said, “Either make the tree good, and his fruit good; or else make the tree corrupt, and his fruit corrupt: for the tree is known by his fruit” (Matt. 12:33).

The old carnal sinful nature has been put to death in Christ. We may not feel like it at times, but in God’s eyes our old nature is dead with Christ on the cross–whether we feel it or not. There are still some habits and faults, to be sure, that must be dealt with as we add temperance to the seedling of faith now planted in our hearts. These spiritual attributes come with maturity in Christ “till Christ be formed in us.”

The Spirit of God says that our “old man is crucified with Christ.” Just like the subjects of a natural king did in the days of old, we rather have surrendered to the truth expounded to us by the apostles and prophets of God–that God has in these last days “spoken to us by his Son,” the “Prince of peace.” God’s Son, the Christ, is “the heir of all things,” and by him God made the worlds (Heb. 1:2). Christ is the “King of kings.” He is the Logos, “the Word,” the Plan and Purpose of God. If we get in line with the King and His thoughts, then we will be right with God. It is His sovereign word that has spoken: Our old life has died on the cross with Christ. Period. Whether we accept the fact or not. Lost man becomes found when he believes it.

The Modern Ego

The angst of the modern ego erupts from this molten thought: There is Someone else who is over us, in charge of us, more powerful than us, more knowledgeable, wiser. In a word, we humans must come off our high horse and surrender to the King of the universe, known in English as Jesus Christ, but whose Hebrew name more closely resembles the Hebrew name Yahshua.

If you could boil down man’s spiritual problems, you would scrape off the bottom of the pot a spoonful of humility. Humility comes when we realize that there is a Supreme being who is immortal, and we are mere human beings, frail and, oh, so mortal. He knows all things, and it is our privilege to be privy to some of His secrets and mysteries. When He says that our old sinful nature, with all its selfish, egotistical carelessness, is dead, then it is gone. We need to believe Him! He says that our old nature died with Christ. In His eyes and in His mind, we have obtained from Him a new life. He has spoken His word about the matter. It has come to pass. Since He believes that we have a new life, then our new life in Him is the truth. Believing Him transforms us into the answer to all our problems. We start there in what His word says. Our feelings and imaginations must conform with what He says about our spiritual condition. Always remember this: Our feelings and emotions will let us down.

Our spiritual walk must show that we believe Him–that He is all powerful and is everything good in this world, and we are but “a vapor, that appears for a little time, and then vanishes away” (James 4:14). Without Him we are doomed to wander in our lowly estate, destined to inhabit the dusty chambers where no cry escapes. This should change mankind’s direction.

But what do most humans do? We strut and preen the feathers of our pride which has deluded us into thinking that our mean and insignificant thoughts surge from an intelligent mind. We believe that we are in control, that we are the captains of our own fates…until we first peer directly into Death’s empty eyes and realize that the time of our departure is imminent. This crushes and grinds our thoughts to powder, now mixed with tears, which makes a merciful balm-of-Gilead that anoints our eyes that we may finally see another face, the royal countenance of our King.

And what will we encounter? We will see Him as the sovereign King, first in all things, but humble and merciful to us His people. When our hearts truly look at Him this way as our King, then we will have come home like the prodigal son did, and He will deal with us as family. And He will say to us, “Well done thou good and faithful servant…”    Kenneth Wayne Hancock

[From Journal entry dated 12-9-12. This will be used in a chapter in my new book that I am working on now entitled The Additions to the Faith, to be published in 2023]

7 Comments

Filed under additions to our faith, Bible, children of God, Christ, cross, crucified with Christ, death of self, elect, faith, kingdom of God, Spirit of God, spiritual growth

My Articles Now Appear on “Medium”

Medium is a gigantic internet platform with millions of readers who want content that shines brightly. Come sample our latest article. It is found here: https://medium.com/@kwayneh1947/big-tech-the-21st-century-god-22a45e925988 .

Come see what all the excitement is about. God bless.

Kenneth Wayne Hancock

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Yahweh’s Joy Is Our Strength

On those dark and painful days of doubt, we sometimes wonder, “Where will I find the strength to carry on? I know that I am weak, and deep down I know that God is my source. But how does it happen? What is the spiritual mechanism that transfers His strength to us?

In the end, strength to weather the world’s “whips and scorns” does not come from us. We are the weak ones in the equation. We are the ones manufacturing a grim quizzical look toward our troubles. But this faux face of courage ultimately fades as God backs us into a tight corner to face down our personal enemies—Doubt and Unbelief. These culprits prevent us from getting strength. But God’s elect will overcome all doubts and unbelief.

The elect are those whom He has chosen to be the first to tap into and manifest the full strength of the Spirit. They are “a kind of first fruits.” They are the first humans that He will fully show His secrets to during this, the time of the end. They will learn how their old, weak, sinful nature dies on the cross with Christ. It has already died on the cross with Christ. “Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with Christ, that the body of sin might be destroyed that henceforth we should not serve sin” (Romans 6: 6). And then we are “buried with him in baptism, wherein also you are risen with him” by just believing that God has “raised him from the dead” (Colossians 2: 12: 13). Just believe in the Resurrection? Yes, both Christ’s and now yours, too !

Halleluyah! Faith! Belief! It’s God’s faith in His resurrection plan, not our puny faith. The truth is, there is only one faith—His (Eph. 4:5). It is the “faith of the Son of God.” That’s where we tap into His strength.

The Joy of Yahweh

The “joy of Yahweh is our strength.” At first glance, that sounds good. The joy of God. He has joy; we don’t, as seen in the previous scenario. And then we begin to see that when we are down, weak and without strength, we can look at our Creator’s joy, and we can wait and wait and, alas, somehow it is not becoming our joy. We do not get strengthened by this. We don’t understand about how to tap into His strength.

There’s a deep revelation here. Yes, the “joy of the LORD is our strength,” but it is when we realize and believe that it is no longer I that lives but Christ that lives in me (Gal. 2:20). We will rejoice with great joy when we believe this: We no longer live in our flesh bodies, which now is His body. We are dead and our “life is hid with Christ in God” (Col. 3:3). It is the Spirit that now lives in our earthly bodies. When we really believe this word of God, great joy will abound and gush through us like rivers of living waters of joy and with it, strength.

This is the revelation simply put: We are dead. We have, however, through belief in his resurrection, a new life living inside us. It is eternal life; it is Christ that lives within us now, even when we don’t feel like it.

We are now members of a spiritual body called “Christ.” We now live in Him, and he lives in us. We must not look at Him after the flesh, but after the Spirit, this spiritual way that the apostles saw Him. When we believe that it is no longer us that live, but Christ that lives in us, then we will see wonderful strength-giving things. When He has joy, we have joy because it is Him exulting in us. When He strengthens, we get strengthened because that’s what the one Spirit does; He shares His strength, along with many other things. We need only to ask the “great cloud of witnesses that have walked with Him. They will tell us.        Kenneth Wayne Hancock (from a Journal entry 12-7-21)

Leave a comment

Filed under belief, Bible, body of Christ, Christ, church, crucified with Christ, death of self, eternal life

He Shall Be Called the Everlasting Father

Christ has many titles and names: A few of them are the Savior, the King of kings, the Lamb of God, the Son of God, and the Everlasting…Father? The Son shall be called the Father? How can that be? Let’s all hold on a minute and let the Spirit explain.

Every December hundreds of millions of Christians all over the world quote from Isaiah the prophet. The Spirit through him is announcing the coming of the Christ child: “For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given…” The “child” here is universally believed to be the Son of God. Most stop there. They see that it is talking about the babe in the manger. But some go on reading: “…and the government shall be upon his shoulder…” Here they see a grown-up Christ becoming the King of the kingdom of God during the Thousand Year Reign of Christ! All but a few will stop there. But the overcomers will read on to the end of the verse. Speaking of Christ: “…And his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The Everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace” (Isa. 9:6).

In one verse, the Spirit shows us a vision of the incarnation of Christ, from His birth to His death. We see His Resurrection and His ascension to the throne. And finally, we are given this nugget of golden knowledge: The Son’s “name shall be called the “Everlasting Father.” That bit of information is revelatory truth hidden in a mystery.  

And it is here that a chosen few will scratch their heads and ponder what they have just read.

How can the Son of God be the Everlasting Father?

Those who dig deep will immediately desire to know other scriptures that back this up. Christ’s own words bring up this idea of oneness. “I and my Father are one” (John 10:30; 17:11). Philip asked to be shown the Father. Christ replied, “He that has seen Me has seen the Father” (John 14:9). “He that sees me sees him that sent Me” (John 12:45). And we know the Father Yahweh sent the Son. Christ’s most fervent prayer is “that they [His followers] may be one, as we are…That they all may be one; as thou, Father, art in me and I in thee, that they also may be one in us (John 17:11, 21-22). Christ is praying for us, that we can become one with Him and the Father that dwells inside of the Son.

To know Christ as the Everlasting Father is to really know Him. And it is the key to the second part of this verse: “That I may know Him, and the power of His resurrection…” (Phil. 3:10). Knowing Him through the lens of Oneness opens the door into becoming responsible stewards of His resurrection power. In other words, believing in Oneness comes before channeling the power of God.  

We are talking about the power that Christ and His apostles wielded—the power to speak words that transforms a drug addict into a disciple. It is the power to heal people trapped in the prison of cerebral palsy, to regenerate their nervous system with the resurrection power of God. It is the power to raise the dead. He promised us this: “Whatsoever you shall ask the Father in my name, He will give it to you…Ask and you shall receive” (John 16:24). It is a wide-open promise with no limitations for those in that level of spiritual growth.

Solving the Mystery

So how do we become one with the Father and the Son? How do we obtain the same understanding that Christ had about oneness? It starts with His word about the Father. First, the Father is the invisible Spirit Yahweh. The Spirit through the apostle Paul said that the Son of God “is the image of the invisible God” (Col. 1:l 5). The Son is the vessel that contains the Father. The Son is now comprised of several beings, not just “the man from Galilee.” Christ is the head, and we Christians are part of His body, His spiritual body. The Son is the body, the church; the fulness of Him that fills all in all…” (Eph. 1:23).

It was the Father that did the miracles through the Son. The Son said as much. “The Father that dwells in Me, He does the works” (Jn 14:19). The “works” are the miracles that the Son performed.

So then, when we see the Son, we are seeing both the Son and the Father, who is an invisible Spirit dwelling in the Son. And through God’s great grace and mercy, He has delivered on His promise to include us in being a part of the corporate body of the Son, the true church (ecclesia). This all happens by believing what He believes about each of us. It is all by faith. It is all about believing the tenets He has given to us about the oneness of the Godhead. When we believe His word on this, then His promises are activated, enabling us to walk through the door into “the power of the resurrection.”

That is how important these words are. For those who reject all of this will fade back to their theory-cluttered lives. And they will be like the archaeologist who stands on a Honduran jungle mound, dismissing it as an ancient dump site. Yet three meters below his feet, the bones of a Mayan prince begin to turn over in a gold laden grave.   Kenneth Wayne Hancock

7 Comments

Filed under oneness

“What Becomes of the Brokenhearted?”

So went the Sixties love ballad. But now God has a heartbreak of much greater importance for us, one needed for our spiritual growth.

For the closer we get to fulfilling God’s goal for us—to be His fully matured sons and daughters—the more is our need to be broken.

Call it self-protection, but we in our original state harden at heartbreak. We squirm away from suffering. Because the history of mankind is painted with pain, we sequester ourselves, building turrets on our castles of consciousness.

We are careful each day to put on man’s armor to protect us from the myriad souls who would rifle through our defenses with their troubles. If we were not hardened, we feel we would weep and lament for the needs of humanity. As medics in a MASH style hospital in Vietnam, we had to harden our hearts just to make it through another day of death and human destruction.

But now our Example arrives on the scene of our existence. He is Christ our King, the great Healer and Creator of the heavens and the earth and all that therein is. We see Him walking about humbly, a broken man, a man of grief and suffering. He was a man of sorrows—our sorrows. He looked out and observed faithless men, and He suffered, knowing what the world would go through.

He knew all this, but how would He get man to begin to love and be merciful to each other? He would first exhibit the greatest love in the world: To die for another. Thus, He left us an example “that we should follow His steps.” He would deliver us and command us to “present our bodies a living sacrifice.” In so doing, the seed of agape Love, which is God, would germinate by faith, and that Seed would grow into “trees of righteousness.” We are those trees, my brothers and sisters.

But before all of this happening, the ground of our hearts must be broken up to receive the Seed. The hardened ground of pride will not bear any kind of spiritual fruit.

And so it goes. Most men prattle on. Their grudges grow into granite walls. And there man lies down for the last time, the only thing left is a helpless granite slab, never to be remembered again, lost in a tomb of dust with no hope, except the Resurrection.

Believing this brings a broken humility which God rewards with grace. We all should ask Him for brokenness. God is near to those of a broken heart. That’s where we will find Him.     Kenneth Wayne Hancock

8 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized